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Kaoklai Kaennorsing
The Thai Team Leader Kaoklai Kaennorsing may have the looks of a pop star, but this KhonKaen native is no lightweight when it comes to muaythai.

Having pliedhis trade on the international muaythai and K1 circuits, the TVC ThaiTeam Leader has done the rounds and is as tough as they come. Thepolitely-spoken fighter is a man with a mission as we found out when wecaught up with him for a chat recently:

Kaoklai Kaennorsing may have the looks of a pop star, but this KhonKaen native is no lightweight when it comes to muaythai. Having pliedhis trade on the international muaythai and K1 circuits, the TVC ThaiTeam Leader has done the rounds and is as tough as they come. Thepolitely-spoken fighter is a man with a mission as we found out when wecaught up with him for a chat recently:

EB: When did you first get involved in muaythai?

KK: Well, I started training when I was just 8 and I had my first fight when I was 9.

EB: What have been your greatest career achievements?
KK: Winning the Rajadamnern title twice was very special, but I am also very proud to have represented Thailand abroad and won the K-1 World Grand Prix in Seoul 2004.

EB: How did you get your nickname the Giant Killer?
KK: Well, that came about on the K-1 circuit. I was always fighting opponents who were much bigger than me, both taller and heavier, and I was able to beat many of them through being faster and more mobile.

EB: Who was your toughest opponent?
KK: Again, that was probably on the K-1 circuit. Hong-Man Choi was twice my size when I fought him in the 2005 K-1 World Grand Prix. I tried to be faster and get in a lot of kicks, and I took him to an extra round, but he was just too strong.

EB: Which was your most memorable fight?
KK: Well, there are two that stand out for me. When I beat Alexey Ignashov he was 80 lbs heavier than me and 8 inches taller. It was also a very important fight so I always remember it. The other one was against Mighty Mo. When I fought him, I was the lightest and the youngest fighter ever to have appeared in the K-1 World Grand Prix Championships. Mighty Mo was the heaviest fighter in the tournament at 280 lbs and he had already won the Las Vegas Grand Prix. I managed to use my speed and agility to put him down with a flying kick at the end of the first round. It was a very special feeling.

EB: What does Thailand vs Challenger mean to you?
KK: I am very excited about it. It’s great that we have this big international muaythai series here in Thailand. Many people want to fight against Thais at muaythai and a lot of us have been abroad to fight, but now we can say that if you want to fight us at our sport, you have to come and fight us in Thailand.

EB: What does it mean to you to be the Thai Team Leader?
KK: It is a great honour for me. I love my country so I am very proud to be the Thai Team Leader. Of course, muaythai began in Thailand so I have to make sure that every fighter in the Thai team knows that when we fight our challengers, we are defending our national pride. I can’t tell you how important that is to us.

 
      

Time Schedule

Thailand VS Challenger
2011 Series

Grand Opening : July
Queens Cup : August
VS Europe : September
VS Asia : October
VS Germany : November